Vinyl proves that music can be an experience

Evelyn Esek, Multimedia Editor

You slide the record out of the sleeve and place it on the turntable. You raise the needle and move it to the beginning of the side, and the record starts to spin. You hear the memorable static sound of the needle running through the groove, and the music begins to play.

Listening to vinyl records is a great way to experience music. While fans can listen to an entire album digitally, most people just add their favorite songs to a playlist. Artists who release their music on vinyl are able to choose the order that they want their listeners to hear the songs. They can creatively arrange their music to flow together with seamless transitions, like Pink Floyd’s The Wall or Tommy by The Who.

Albums not only contain the physical record, but the cover and sleeve as well. It also can contain a lyric sheet, possibly a poster or stickers, notes from the artist or producer, photographs, and iconic album artwork.

Music fans can dig through racks of used records that are waiting for a new home, hoping they can find a keeper or one that strikes their fancy. ”

Some of the most recognizable album cover art includes Nirvana’s Nevermind, The Eagles’ Hotel California, The Clash’s London Calling, Fleetwood Mac’s Rumours, and most famously, Pink Floyd’s The Dark Side of the Moon, with the light prism on the black background.

Listening to vinyl also provides a hobby for collectors: record store shopping. Music fans can dig through racks of used records that are waiting for a new home, hoping they can find a keeper or one that strikes their fancy.

Unlike with digital music, the internet is not needed to listen to vinyl. Also, the highest and lowest frequencies are compressed to fit an mp3 file, so some of the listening experience is taken out when listening digitally. Plus, listening to music digitally does not have the nostalgic crackling sound or the smell of old vinyl.

While it can be pricey to invest in physical music, once fans own a record, they can play it as many times as they want on repeat. Especially in recent years, vinyl has seen a resurgence in popularity for listeners. Artists are even marketing vinyl for their recent releases with added bonuses for buying the physical music, such as the four copies of Taylor Swift’s Midnights combining to make a clock.

As the proud owner of more than 75 vinyl records from family members, record shops, and some bought new, I have a slight bias towards vinyl. My advice? Get a turntable and listen for yourself.