What to Binge Watch: Don’t you forget about John Hughes

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Photo via Wikimedia Commons

The Breakfast Club (pictured above) is one of John Hughes most famous movies.

Kevin Hutchinson, Staff Writer

Teens of every generation need coming-of-age movies, which reflect the tumultuous and terrifying experience of growing up. Viewers need to identify with characters, understanding their struggles and taking inspiration for their own lives. No movies allow for this effect like those produced, written, and directed by the legendary John Hughes.

In his early 30s, Hughes helmed a slew of coming-of-age films still regarded as the most popular in history. He wrote Ferris Bueller’s Day Off, The Breakfast Club, Pretty in Pink, and Sixteen Candles, all of which depicted American teenagers with unparalleled realism. The characters of each film endure distinct issues experienced by teenagers, allowing viewers to see real-life problems mirrored and solved on the big screen. 

Upon their release, these films were revolutionary. Never before had mainstream movies starred teens as protagonists or portrayed their struggles with biting realism. 

Despite their buoyant humor and immense entertainment value, these films represent the central tenets of adolescent angst: romance, neuroticism, parents, and the complex social game of high school. They tell relatable stories with likable heroes.”

Despite their buoyant humor and immense entertainment value, these films represent the central tenets of adolescent angst: romance, neuroticism, parents, and the complex social game of high school. They tell relatable stories with likable heroes.

In Ferris, the carefree teenage title character tours Chicago, teaching his neurotic best friend of a better approach to life.

Pretty in Pink tackles a brutal love triangle and a father’s struggles with regret.

Sixteen Candles features a tense sibling dynamic and dysfunctional teen romances.

The Breakfast Club, hailed widely as the most emotionally wrenching film ever marketed to young adults, wrestles with intense themes that resonate with people of every generation. The film’s five protagonists reflect high school stereotypes, and the unlikely friendships formed between them during Saturday detention propel them into maturity, growth, and a new way of perceiving their relationships with people.

For teens who feel lost, dazed, and confused, Hughes’ masterpieces create an invigorating tonic that can uplift, inspire, and humor audiences. To absorb important life lessons in two hours or less, turn to the Hughes films.