O’Brien’s new album is nothing to get too excited about

The+best+of+the+songs+deserve+little+to+no+praise%2C+as+they+repeat+the+same+message+of+rebellion+and+heartbreak.
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O’Brien’s new album is nothing to get too excited about

The best of the songs deserve little to no praise, as they repeat the same message of rebellion and heartbreak.

The best of the songs deserve little to no praise, as they repeat the same message of rebellion and heartbreak.

Photo Via Genius

The best of the songs deserve little to no praise, as they repeat the same message of rebellion and heartbreak.

Photo Via Genius

Photo Via Genius

The best of the songs deserve little to no praise, as they repeat the same message of rebellion and heartbreak.

Brooke Scanlon, Staff Writer

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Pop artist Olivia O’Brien rose to fame after being featured in “I Hate You I Love You” with R&B singer Gnash. The hit song was the peak of O’Brien’s career, and she has not produced anything nearly as successful.

O’Brien’s new album, Was It Even Real, consists of a series of repetitive songs with the same monotone tunes. O’Brien’s voice has certainly changed since her debut with Gnash, and her vocals are a letdown throughout the entire album.

The album opens with “Purpleworld,” which is the most popular song in the album, but it’s nothing to get excited about. It follows the album’s common theme and boring chords.

The common theme of the album is heartbreak and depression. The exception is “Just Friends,” which is an outlier and talks about “friend zoning.”

“Just a Boy”  and “We Lied to Each Other” are the standout songs on the album.

“We Lied to Each Other” showcases different chords and technique but spreads a negative message, which is recurrent throughout the entire album.

The first song released as a single, “Just a Boy” has lyrics that produce a strong sense of independence.

The best of the songs deserve little to no praise, as they repeat the same message of rebellion and heartbreak. Most of the songs were assembled with little effort, and it shows through the lyrics.

Overall this album is monotonic and repetitive in the lyrics and messages it desperately tries to portray. It is not worth the $9.99 price or even the time to stream online.

“I Hate U, I Love U” has been the peak of O’Brien’s career and ultimately may stand as her first and last hurrah.