The Purbalite

Inside the Lines: Players crush homers record

Photo via Wikimedia Commons under Creative Commons license.

Photo via Wikimedia Commons under Creative Commons license.

Nick Pouch, Staff Writer

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It was the year of the home run in major league baseball, as a record 6,102 were hit in the regular season this year — smashing the previous total of 5,693 from 2000.t was the year of the home run in major league baseball, as a record 6,102 were hit in the regular season this year — smashing the previous total of 5,693 from 2000.

The new record was set on Sept. 19 by Alex Gordon of the Kansas City Royals, while there were still another 168 games left to be played among all teams for the season.

Many fans loved the multitude of home runs this year, but most pitchers hated it. Meanwhile, everyone has been trying to figure out how it happened, with some wondering if the ball has been juiced.

Some pitchers, including former Cy Young winner David Price, have said they felt a difference in the baseballs this year compared to how they felt in previous years. MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred, however, said that the willingness of batters to strike out has led to more and longer homers.

Whether the multitude of home runs is from changes in the ball or the batters’ approach, there is no question there has been a difference. This year fans have seen one of the most dominant performances of the last decade by Miami Marlins outfielder Giancarlo Stanton. He hit 59 home runs this year, which is tied for the ninth-most home runs in a season by any player.

Also, fans have seen a dominant performance by rookies, as 10 rookies hit at least 20 home runs, headlined by New York Yankee Aaron Judge, who has hit a rookie record 52 this season.

One final theory about the power surge is that this also could be a new steroid era, since the last record was set in 2000. Although not many players have been suspended this year for steroids, they could be caught next season. This is a possibility, as back in 2000, many players were not caught until the next season.

If it turns out to be another steroid problem, fans would be upset that the MLB has not learned from 2000.

About the Writer
Nick Pouch, Staff Writer
Nick is a second-year staff writer and is part of the sports broadcasting team. He can be found on the boys volleyball team or playing the saxophone in the marching band. He is also a huge Pittsburgh sports fan.
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Inside the Lines: Players crush homers record